Will Checkins Be The New Inbound Links?

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After having had some fun half-mocking health care uses of location-based media such Foursquare, BrightKite and Gowalla, I do think these services represent a small part of larger set of trends. Although these services have thus far emerged as stand-alone media, their essential functions can be thought of as modules which eventually will be mashed up and integrated and subsumed into bigger bits. And now I wonder if geolocation-based media may usher forth a new kind of attention-currency.

Just as links to a website play an important role in how we find businesses in Google, I can see how checkins could be part of an emerging trend to bring hyperlinks to “real” places. Services like Foursquare provide information about business in several ways, two of which are by number of checkins and the tips/reviews patrons tap into their mobile devices. Additionally, other meta-data (such as the number of tweets or blog posts referring to a particular venue on Foursquare) conceivably add attention-weight to businesses.

What’s interesting about these technologies, is how (and that) people use them. We now know – for good or ill – that there are people who willingly share personal information which only years ago they would have concealed within an intimate context. The revealing nature of technology becomes clearer as novel technologies beget novel re-purposing, which in turn reveal things about ourselves.

And so, anytime we consider these media, we have to not only consider their effect on human beings but also on their effect on the evolution of technology itself. The Web is giving rise to metadata-based media. Which is to say if the medium is the message, then the message of the future Web is metadata. Just something to consider as social-streams become a staple of human interaction.

Anyway, I can envision the emergence of other services which wish to capitalize on this new kind of IRL hyperlinking. What do you think? Will we see the emergence of a new kind of attention economy, where metadata like geolocation and tagging become valuable commodities?

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Instant Is Not Real-time

Facebook, Inc.
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Should Enterprise software be like Facebook? That’s a question Salesforce CEO Mark Benioff recently raised. While reading Dennis Howlett’s analysis, Dennis makes a very simple but easy-to-overlook point about the difference between instant media and real-time media. It’s an important point, one I believe gets lost in the noise and hype about social media.

INSTANT CONFUSION

One of my main focuses is health care adoption and employment of software for improving collaboration and communication among patients and doctors and nurses. It’s important, therefore, to understand the property differences between media and the different contexts, conditions and processes needed for successful deployment. What works for consumers (Facebook) doesn’t necessarily work for business.

One of the properties of media like Twitter and Facebook has to do with time. Twitter and Facebook statuses are instant (at least when there are not server errors). Instant is exactly that: immediate, without regard to relevance. Real-time, however, has to do with relevance. In an enterprise, what matters are information flows – and without context and relevance, information is just data.

Real-time is more than just anytime (which is what instant is) – I need the right information delivered at the right time within the right context throughout the right process.

This distinction between instant and real-time is critical because any software developed must take into account the purposes and needs and contexts in order to ensure proper user experience and appropriate results.

So no: I don’t believe Enterprise software should be designed like Facebook. It follows then, that any software designed for patients and hospitals and doctors and nurses must not confuse themselves with consumer applications.

BUILD IT RIGHT AND SPEAK CLEARLY

Therefore, any healthcare enterprise analogues of media like Twitter, must take into account the difference between instant and real-time. The applications must take into account the sociological and informational needs of clinical processes. Otherwise, disaster is certainly built-in.

Software lock-in is a huge problem in technology. I fear that philosophical lock-in of social media philosophy may be one our time’s greatest threats. (As an illustration of what I mean, the Privacy Is Dead mantra is, I fear, just one self-fulfilling instance of social media fallacy – it’s one of the most dangerous myths propounded and accepted by superficial thinking these days – it’s a dangerous mind-virus.)

We need a clear language when discussing technology – especially media technologies. Confusing instant with real-time is sloppy thinking. In a health care context, it’s downright dangerous.

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The Winkler Nurses Case on #RNchat

When I started #RNchat last year (@RNchat on Twitter), my hope was to assemble a simple and supple forum for nurses and the public to discuss important issues from the perspective of a diverse group of people.

Here’s a re-post of the transcript for Friday, February 12, 2010’s RNchat, with my commentary on the Winkler County, Texas Nurses case:

Below is a SlideShare of #RNchat for Friday February 12, 2010, organized in chronological order (from beginning of chat to sometime just after). The chat was moderated by Ellen Richter (@EllenRichter on Twitter).

The #WinklerRNs case was the topic of conversation. In Winkler County, Texas, nurses who went through the torment of being charged for leaking private medical information. One of the nurses went to trial and was acquitted within one hour. Now the nurses are responding

This is an important case, one which – among many other things – highlights the need for swift and bold and sturdy nursing organizations. This case isn’t just about defending nurses: it’s ultimately about the safety of patients, the ethical fiber of nurses and doctors and administrators and government officials. Had Anne Mitchel been found guilty, the ramifications could well have been ominous for the integrity of our entire health care landscape.

Friday’s RNchat, discussed topical features of this case: the best practices for whistle-blowing and how to get more organizations behind nurses and the public. Feel free to share the presentation below.

Let’s hope that nurses don’t become scapegoated victims. Do nurses make technical mistakes? Sure they do – we all do. But it’s critical that nurses never feel afraid of expressing their sincere perceptions, their intuition nor their ethical belief system. People can die under those circumstances.

Nurses are the last Jedi Nights of our faltering Republic. A cheesy metaphor? Yes. But it’s true. Anne Mitchell and the other nurses involved in this case are Jedi Knights who fought through a derangement of how ethics and law and responsibility should work.

Anne Mitchell has gone through a Kafka-like hell. Let’s hope she receives comfort and equity and sanity.

NOTE: We also are preparing for a special even in conjunction with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Details upcoming soon!

As always, thank you to those who joined today. If you’re new to #RNchat, just follow @RNchat on Twitter and we’ll provide updates and links on how to make the best use of this nursing chat. You can also send inquires to info [at] RNchat [dot] org.

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