The Winkler Nurses Case on #RNchat

When I started #RNchat last year (@RNchat on Twitter), my hope was to assemble a simple and supple forum for nurses and the public to discuss important issues from the perspective of a diverse group of people.

Here’s a re-post of the transcript for Friday, February 12, 2010’s RNchat, with my commentary on the Winkler County, Texas Nurses case:

Below is a SlideShare of #RNchat for Friday February 12, 2010, organized in chronological order (from beginning of chat to sometime just after). The chat was moderated by Ellen Richter (@EllenRichter on Twitter).

The #WinklerRNs case was the topic of conversation. In Winkler County, Texas, nurses who went through the torment of being charged for leaking private medical information. One of the nurses went to trial and was acquitted within one hour. Now the nurses are responding

This is an important case, one which – among many other things – highlights the need for swift and bold and sturdy nursing organizations. This case isn’t just about defending nurses: it’s ultimately about the safety of patients, the ethical fiber of nurses and doctors and administrators and government officials. Had Anne Mitchel been found guilty, the ramifications could well have been ominous for the integrity of our entire health care landscape.

Friday’s RNchat, discussed topical features of this case: the best practices for whistle-blowing and how to get more organizations behind nurses and the public. Feel free to share the presentation below.

Let’s hope that nurses don’t become scapegoated victims. Do nurses make technical mistakes? Sure they do – we all do. But it’s critical that nurses never feel afraid of expressing their sincere perceptions, their intuition nor their ethical belief system. People can die under those circumstances.

Nurses are the last Jedi Nights of our faltering Republic. A cheesy metaphor? Yes. But it’s true. Anne Mitchell and the other nurses involved in this case are Jedi Knights who fought through a derangement of how ethics and law and responsibility should work.

Anne Mitchell has gone through a Kafka-like hell. Let’s hope she receives comfort and equity and sanity.

NOTE: We also are preparing for a special even in conjunction with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Details upcoming soon!

As always, thank you to those who joined today. If you’re new to #RNchat, just follow @RNchat on Twitter and we’ll provide updates and links on how to make the best use of this nursing chat. You can also send inquires to info [at] RNchat [dot] org.

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An Interview of @EndreJofoldi of HealthMash

The Web abounds with health care information (good, bad, ugly). In fact, for all practical purposes we have an infinite abundance of content on the web. And this abundance has produced a scarcity of meaning, relevance and reliability. So any attempts to provide searchers of content are welcome efforts.

THE WORLD WIDE HEALTH WEB

HealthMash is one of the newer search engines for health care content and media by a team from Hungary and the US. HealthMash returns an array of finds and displays them within categories. Here in the US, most of the Web products that receive the most attention come out of Silicon Valley. What goes unnoticed is just how much remarkable work gets done around the world. Hungary, for example, has traditionally had one of the highest per capita rates of mathematicians. So it’s encouraging to see these products being developed internationally. And in the arena of health care and social software, Dr. Bertalan Mesko ( @Berci on Twitter) is doing amazing things with ScienceRoll.

HealthMash enables users to search generally, or ask the engine to return results garnered from Twitter or for Video for Images or Drugs and other contextualizing formats. Here’s how HealthMash presents Cystic Fibrosis within its Clinical Trials results (click to enlarge):

HealthMash Search Result for Cystic Fibrosis

Contextualizing information is an important process, especially since we now have so many sources of potential information. I won’t review the reliability of the results here, but I recommend test driving the interface. Another service that attempts to bring context and curation to health care search results is iTriageHealth.

For now, I’ll let Endre Jofoldi of HealthMash (@EndreJofoldi on Twitter) explain more about the product he and his team are working on. My hope is that these interviews engender entrepreneurial interest in the what I’m starting to call the Health Web. By the way: If you’re a developer and seek funding, I recommend following Robert Scoble’s  Twitter List of Venture Capitalists. Yes, Twitter has its uses. :)

THE INTERVIEW

You seem to be passionate about the Web and building custom search engines. Tell us about yourself – where are you from, what you do and what got you interested in health care and web technologies and communities.

The HealthMash “virtual team” in the US and Hungary consists of experts in medical informatics, computational linguists and software developers. Our individual team members have worked on many health related projects at the National Institutes of Health and the National Library of Medicine, thus we have first hand familiarity with the challenges of the health arena. Although most of our team are relatively young and healthy, a couple of the “old timers” have had enough health problems themselves and in their families, to have special empathy for all patients. So as you can see, we are naturally interested in web technologies and health communities.

HealthMash, which bills itself as a Revolutionary Health Knowledge Base and Semantic Search Engine, piqued my interest. What inspired you to build this type of search  engine? What does HealthMash do that other health search engines don’t? What technologies are under the hood?  What are your plans for HealthMash?

There are thousands of good health sites on the Web, like Medlineplus.gov and the MayoClinic,com, however they are limited in their scope and coverage. There are also tens of thousands of sites that offer questionable or harmful health advice. At the same time, we also know that even the best health practitioners can’t keep up with all the new developments in biomedical research and apply all that knowledge to the individual needs of patients. Our inspiration was our own health concerns and the inevitable health problems of our families and friends and fellow human beings, to envision a web site that offers the most comprehensive and most reliable health information to enable informed personal health decisions:

  • Thus, our goal with HealthMash has been to interpret the meaning of health related queries and, using our proprietary semantic search algorithms and bring together all kinds of potentially relevant information for the user (trusted health information, News, clinical trials, the research literature etc.)
  • Another important goal has been to support user exploration and discovery. HealthMash facilitates serendipity and discovery via our automatically generated  Health Knowledge Base which contains millions of relevant associations between health concerns, treatments, drugs and alternative medicine approaches, to name a few.
  • It is the sum of all of the content and technological innovations “under the hood”, and our passion for promoting healthy living, that distinguishes us from the competition.

Do you see it primarily as a stand alone search engine or are you considering developing social features into the service?

First I would like to turn this question into a bit different direction. HealthMash can be utilized by other search services. Our Explore and Discover section is also available through an API for third parties to embed it into their medical databases and search systems. To answer your question, developing social features into HealthMash has been planned from day one, but not implemented yet. As a matter of fact, our Hungarian health sites already have some social features in them (http://varoszoba.hu means “Waiting Room” and http://dokim.hu means “My Doc” ).

What other projects are you currently working on? If you had the necessary resources to build your dream health care technology/application, what would it look like and what problems would it seek to solve?

HealthMash keeps us pretty busy, given that it is in beta stage. And of course we also have to make a living, so we are working on “bread and butter” custom search and federated search engine projects for paying customers both in Europe and in the USA. If we had the necessary resources – and frankly we are hoping that a major player or venture capital firm will provide those resources to us sooner or later – our “dream” health care application would be to add sufficient intelligence to HealthMash to be able to answer any health related question and do it in all languages and all countries of the world.

Thank you, Endre. Keep us up-to-date. And good luck to your team. For more, you can always follow  Endre on Twitter.

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Zen and the Art of the Tweet

I’ve been thinking a lot about the nature of our collective mindfulness lately. Every month, millions of more people are increasing their connectivity to the Web. Facebook’s gravity keeps swelling. Twitter continues to flap upwards in users. Mobile devices and operating systems continue to evolve and proliferate. It seems every week a new feature or service or gadget makes a debut.

The Web is not only expanding like a universe but it’s also infiltrating every nook of our daily lives. And it’s expanding and infiltrating at an accelerating pace. What effect is all this happening on our capacity to attentively engage with life? What disciplines and skills and understanding do we need to acquire as the Web continues its unstoppable inflation?

PRESENT MOMENT, WONDERFUL MOMENT

Thousands of years ago certain cultures around the world discovered and cultivated the art of breathing mindfully. In some cases, entire religious traditions grew out of these practices.

Our brains and sense-organs are powerful attention-devices. Our minds are always teaming with thoughts, feelings, hunches and visions. Even asleep, our brains actively stream profuse experiences like dreams. It’s how we survive.

But our very powers of attention and awareness and cognition can distract us from the present-moment happenings of our lives. We’re always breathing, but rarely notice unless we pay attention. And this presents us with a fundamental observation about life: if we’re constantly processing the relentless influx of internal and external sensory data but never focusing our full attention on what happens, how alive are we? For to have a meaningful life, we must feel alive – otherwise we’re just automatons obligated to the patterns made by others and the larger external world.

Being aware of the present moment is the easiest and hardest thing to do. Try it: sit for 5 minutes and pay attention to nothing but your breath. How many times did your mind wander from that simplest of tasks? If you can’t pay attention to your life right now, when do you expect to do it? After you die? In some other world?

TWITTER MIND, MONKEY MIND

Some Buddhists have a phrase for how our minds endlessly flit from one thought to the next:  Monkey Mind. One aim of meditation is to “tame” the Monkey Mind. Not so much to control it, as to pay attention to it – and, in the process of paying attention to a fast-moving mind, paradoxically slow it down to a point where the present moment reveals itself most fully.

Of all social networking sites, perhaps Twitter best exemplifies the electronic version of Monkey Mind. The tiny bursts and pulses of text and hyperlinks stream through the world like flashes of thought across a busy mind. Twitter’s a powerful way to connect with others and receive news and important or trivial nuggets of information. And yet, if you’re not paying attention, it’s easy to get sucked into Twitter Mind – an energetic state of dopamine excitation, where the sense of time is lost.

As more of us use these tools, how do we maintain our sense of mindfulness? How do we tame Twitter Mind? Few of us practice any sort of traditional meditation to discipline our Monkey Mind. Now we have social media. The Social Web is like an extension of the neocortex. It may sound crazy to think that our brains have a new layer, but it’s not a bad way to think about the kind of world the Web is making.

We will need to understand more about the effects of the Web on our brains, on our attention and our ability to feel fully alive between the sliver of light between birth and death that was entrusted to us.

THE NEVER-ENDING STREAM

When was the last time you felt the beating of your heart? The breath in and out of your chest? The sound of rain falling on leaf-mush?

Do you know why you’re on Twitter? How long you’re on Twitter?

The Art of the Tweet – if there is one – is this: using the medium to learn something about our world and sharing your unique view of it with us mindfully. Life without mindfulness is a life lost. Twitter may increase your awareness of the world around you but only your mind supplies your life with meaning. How are you  maintaining your mind?

Tweets are like raindrops falling into a stream. So are the moments of your life. Are you paying  attention, or something more expensive?

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