Auto-captions on Youtube: All Our Base Be Long Us

The other day I posted this video:

Today I downloaded Google’s transcription of the audio and thought I pass this along to you just for fun. The results a pretty much bizarre. Oh, the SEO implications! 😉

My favorite clip is this:

I’m Phil common

and Phil gramm and are calm

about what

that’s what I meant

Here’s the whole transcript:

still down take money that shot he’s trying to clear up some of the confusion.

recording conversations about markets this conversation and why I think some of his compositions totally misguided misleading and all focus

in my opinion what matters is the audience and all this talk about social marketing and social communications in trying to figure out what’s the best term for this

what I have to say since very simple. the only thing that the way it is really doing with respect to marketing is this just adding a new feature which is the ability to just have a conversation

mister audience what that is your customers the fans

marketing is not about conversations it’s a part having conversations is certainly a part and now the way that that’s what’s exciting about this you can talk to somebody you can be available

but I eat

believe that a lot of companies and the agency’s are making away bigger deal about conversational aspect of these new media

that is really necessary

and all the talk and all that though case

I think the audience is getting lost

the sea having an audience

it’s not the same thing is just broadcasting unilateral messages like spaghetti against the Wall no not by any means

if you don’t have an audience you don’t have a business

you don’t have an organization

the leading nobody

no an important part about businesses leadership

marketing is about presence

it’s about leadership

now you just have media which you can now

it’s a racket get feedback

because shortcut a lot of the

complicating research that the student on twenty third years ago

that is the problem by making too much of this conversation part

to really think about it what kind of world we want with it

to in the world

were all interacting with multiple brands

day to day

I think it’ll destroy that’s nuts

in the last ten fifteen years because of technological changes

people of guns Fed up with

traditional advertised all this kind of spanning house

and I think if you over to the social component with regard to your marketing efforts

I think eventually all this just to get printout from that in the will be back to where we

are now with traditional advertising which is

I don’t want to be with us but we don’t wantto know that brings

this really all people want

it’s just availability

if something goes wrong they want to have some customer service

if you want to be educated

and they want to be educated get questions you want to be the answer

the ultimate people want to be part of the knowns patients

well they they want to be an audience to but they want the ability to be heard

you ask you questions

so this conversation of peace is very important

but it’s not cool

conversation is not a strategy

leading an audience that’s true

just think about that

it’s easy to get lost in all the talk about

still some media to to the basics

if your direct marketer

don’t forget copy skills

long copy

it’s too important to sit now copies of of video

are you text

and I teach and to bill them

interactive on to those are important skills

don’t think that’s clear and facebook

analysts also media stuff

it’s something that’s a big deal

so again but that’s it

being an audience for important tragic the conversation

as Justice still companies

anyway getting questions to for to contact
me

I’m Phil common

and Phil gramm and are calm

about what

that’s what I meant

and if you can’t have a conversation with
me

if they commit a horrible

wait for three six two

zero four five one

and I hope to keep you could stuff

welcome

I guess we’ll have to speak our clearest from now on. You can hear and watch the original here.

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17 Best Posts in 2009- A Year of Social Media and Health Care

2009 was an important year for getting healthcare more up-to-date with web technologies. We have a long way to go: healthcare marketers have begun the process of sorting out the meanings of internet media. 2009 was also a year of extreme noise and echo-chambering. But that’s OK: that happens all the time with novel technologies, especially when there’s little understanding of them nor clarity about their purposes and uses and limits.

On this blog, I’ve always aimed to express my perspective on these technologies (which I believe is rather unique – and it’s this uniqueness which I hope provide you with something of value). Prior to 2009, it was a bit of a lonely place to discuss how health care could best adopt 21st Century technologies. But 2009 brought a first flood of attention. I believe Twitter may deserve credit: many hospital and other health care organizations never understood the Web much, and blogging must have seemed like a purely terrifying experience. But Twitter offered the uninitiated with a simple interface and connection.

As the year moved on, I decided to launch a Twitter chat for registered nurses – and the public in general. The hashtag is #RNchat and you can follow @RNchat on Twitter and subscribe to the blog which posts transcripts of the chats. Since most of the Twitter chats on Twitter are about how to talk about how to talk about talking about Twitter and other social media, I figured at least one of them should be about something that’s actually real. I’m kidding of course. No, I’m not. :)

At any rate, I’ve collected some of my best posts for the year. All of these posts are related to health care – although #3 only very indirectly (I had to include it because it serves as a release from all the social media hype I’ve been hearing for years). Scan the list and pick a few to read and share. Here are the 17 posts:

  1. 140 Health Care Uses for Twitter – I wrote this post because I wanted to start an open conversation about the opportunities we have with technologies and the cultural and regulatory limits stemming them. Years earlier, I had tired of paper medical records and bizarre bureaucratic rituals which slowed the pace and effectiveness of patient care. The idea of using micro-sharing communications as a way to “cut to the chase” in patient care had been working in my mind for some time. This post is the result.
  2. Pharma, Presence Marketing and You – Not having a marketing background – and yet fully understanding the importance of marketing in health care – I’m fascinated at the stumbling blocks beset before pharmaceutical and medical device companies: both from regulatory agencies and the companies’ own prejudices about what marketing means.
  3. Twitter & LSD – 25 Similarities – OK – is this a health care related post? Well, I consider humor a part of health care. And I do touch on the addictive qualities of Twitter in this post. I plan a series of posts in 2010 on Internet Addiction. So, go ahead – read this. And definitely tweet it out!
  4. The Social Capital Algorithm – A simple visual way to break down the utility of social media into simple concepts.
  5. Social Capital: An Accounting View of New Media – I started my career in accounting. As such, I don’t have much tolerance for vague references. And yet we use them all the time. This is just another way to look at the differences between financial capital and social capital.
  6. 1,001 Remarkable Pharma People to Follow on Twitter – A tease of a title. But I explain why you don’t need 1,001 people to follow to get value out of Twitter. Since this post was written, the FDA had a Public Hearing and you can follow the Twitter hashtag  #FDAsm for the latest.
  7. 66 Ominous Predictions About Twitter in Healthcare – This was my attempt at bringing some sanity (albeit humorously) into the social media echo-chamber. Those of us who are truly passionate about these technologies must challenge them. (Some of the Pharma predictions are interesting in light of the Public Hearing later on in the year.)
  8. Healthcare on Google Wave – Google Wave was one of those hyped Google products. I think it’s a powerful set of technologies, even though I don’t use it much myself (the API needs to be developed upon before it becomes truly usable). This is an embed of a Healthcare wave, demonstrating real-time embedding of content from Wave to blog.
  9. A Clinical Infusion of Google Wave -A hypothetical use case for Google Wave in the clinical setting.
  10. Healthcare’s Google-Facebook-Twitter Platform – Questioning the possibility of a gigantic healthcare social platform.
  11. Zen and the Art of the Tweet – Again, the theme of the health care effects of social technologies on our lives.
  12. An Interview with #hcsm Founder @danamlewis
  13. An Interview with @EndreJofoldi of HealthMash
  14. How to Make Health Care Remarkable – The @ePatientDave Interview
  15. Pharma & Social Media: Best Strategic Learning Investment for 2010 – Discussion of an eBook compiled by Ellen Hoenig about what things Pharma should focus on learning in 2010.
  16. Privacy Matters: Dirty Little Secrets Are Essential to Your Health – My attempt at resurrecting privacy from the social media rumors of its death.
  17. Can We Ever End Social Media Nonsense? – My concerns and hopes for the future of the so-called Social Web.

I’m anticipating 2010 to be a fast-paced year with many developments technologically, politically, economically and culturally. I’m hoping that the healthcare community not only continues to learn these technologies but also starts to think reasonably and productively about how to become better organizations.

Social Media won’t make a bad organization good, nor a good organization great. No, people do that. People with brains and creativity and chutzpah. People who have the courage to do what’s never been done before. Are you one of them? Or are you a cog in a machine that’s doomed to shut-down long before you retire? Either way, it’s never too late to change your part of the world.

I love you, my dear readers. Enjoy 2010!

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Healthcare’s Google-Facebook-Twitter Platform

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase

Can’t we just have one place on the web where all of us around the world can congregate to acquire reliable health care content, connect patients with each other, have conversations, trade experiences and otherwise partake in the vastness of health care?

That certainly is a dream – an idea which many patients and families and professionals ponder. After all, Google, Facebook and Twitter respectively demonstrate the power of Search, Social Media and Real-time Connection to accomplish a whole host of objectives. What if we had a health care version of such a triad, unified into one platform? Is it do-able? Or, perhaps more importantly, is it necessary?

A GINORMOUS WEB WITH NO CENTER

As tempting as it may be to have a mega health care social platform, I think such a hope is wrecked by the reality of the Web. The Web is an ever-expanding confluence of machines and people and protocols and media. Like a consciousness, it has no Center, no single brain cell that we can point to and say Here it is, the center of our mind! And yet, like a consciousness, it produces the seamless experiences of awareness and connection and action which we view through our browsers and mobile devices and wherever else the Web infiltrates.

Perhaps the very model for any Web platform for health care communities of content and people lies right in the artful sciences beneath health care itself: the evolutionary underpinnings of networks of the tiny cellular gadgets that supply our lives. Yes, our bodies do have central nervous systems, but life owes itself to the vastly distributed cascading of events which aren’t necessarily centrally-controlled. That is, after all, the wonder and power of our universe’s serendipity. The web of life may be metaphor for the web we started spinning years ago.

So I wonder if our primary challenge in weaving a Health Care Web is understanding the nature of evolutionary systems. That perhaps we need to overcome our linear and strict architectural ways of thinking and building, and seek organic views of the Web.

Historically, in our efforts to wage war against dangerous bacteria and viruses, we have taken a decidedly mechanical approach: discover a vulnerability and attack it. It works, for a time. But then subtle mutations succeed and replicate and the vulnerabilities of our tiny enemies become strengths and we start to lose the war again.

So just as we may need radically different approaches to infectious diseases – approaches which advance natural processes versus stemming them – so too may we need a radical re-think in how we work with the Web. Rather than hoping to overlay a single giant complex that dominates the landscape like a Big Mother, we aught to consider the power of local networks and communities, learn to harness de-centralization and discover how to cull order out of chaos.

In many regards, we already are doing these things. Those of us who use media like Twitter have learned to appreciate the value of curation and we’re always seeking out and playing with toys which help us streamline and enhance our consumption and production of information. Patients seeking health-related content or community similarly need ways of finding the right channels.

Perhaps, then, a key feature of health care online is providing media which improve the skills of patients in how to best derive order of out of chaos and separate verifiable fact from dangerous idiocy. How to accomplish such feats? One way is through individual, localized efforts on the part of patients, providers, technologists, librarians, entrepreneurs – charged with large boluses of initiative and courage.

ALL HEALTH CARE IS LOCAL

What we may need at the large scale isn’t a giant Google-Facebook-Twitter mashup for healthcare. Maybe what we need are media and tools which connect social graphs of people and databases and communities; which enable face-to-face communities which can be weaved back into the Web; which give permissions to patients and family members to port their data however they see fit; which enable providers to be bright facets at the critical nodes of key connections; which integrate emerging technologies and re-mash them into usable interfaces for expedient and curated information.

The fact about online health care communities is that they are, well, communities. Which is to say that their success depends on the particular dynamics and values of the communities. A service which offers forums for different health-related topics may house an amazing Diabetes group but fall short on Schizophrenia. Furthermore, patients and family members experience illnesses in their own unique ways: what may be a great community for someone with breast cancer may be ineffective (or even dangerous) for another.

We have many ways to go with the Health Care Web. We can’t necessarily busy ourselves with one silver bullet. So I offer one tip to the general public: advocate for change at the local level, using public social media to inspire passionate tribes of talented change agents. We can do that much now, without having to wait for the FDA or some other governmental agency to figure out how to hit the update button on Twitter, let alone how to piece together a Health Care Web.

If we can’t get our own family physician to connect with us on just one social medium, how can we connect the multitude of patients and providers globally?

What do you think? Is a Google-Facebook-Twitter Platform of Health Care achievable? Is it even necessary? Perhaps most importantly: is it something we should even desire, or fear?

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Media Skills Workshop – Healthcare Communications

Image representing Google as depicted in Crunc...
Image via CrunchBase

I gave two presentations for the National Association of Healthcare Communicators in Chicago, Priming Healthcare for Twitter and Google Is Watching You: Building Your Reputation on Google.

Healthcare communicators, and the industry in general, are increasingly learning the importance of having an effective presence on the web. Over the last several months, after getting out and meeting people in organizations who are working hard to raise internal awareness of online media, it’s becoming increasingly clear to me that those organizations who have champions who can communicate the value of social technologies are the ones who are going to thrive in the 21st Century. This week’s conference reinforced the belief that such people are out their who are sincerely interested in leveraging those values.

Here are the two presentations I gave yesterday and this morning.

PRIMING HEALTHCARE FOR TWITTER (UPDATED)

GOOGLE IS WATCHING YOU: BUILDING YOUR REPUTATION ON GOOGLE

How successful have your efforts to convey the value of social networking to the leaders of your organization been so far? What are your challenges? Where are the resistance points? Are they related to awareness of how these tools work? Are they related to culture and organizational philosophy? When discussing how social media fits into the ecosystem of your organization, what’s your message? Are you being heard?

Let me know here in the comments. You can follow the tweets at the conference on  #MSW as well as find some very bright people in the industry to connect with.

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Healthcare & Pharma: 10 Years of Google Gone By

MUNICH, GERMANY - SEPTEMBER 06:  In this photo...
Image by Getty Images via Daylife

I like to critique Healthcare & Pharma but I do so because I think they’re one of the most important industries in the world, not just to be controversial. I think these two separate but inter-related industries have some of the brightest people working in them. If anyone should be able to figure out technologies and how to employ them, these two are the ones. So, I’ve been puzzled for over a decade over the industries’ apparent AWOL on the Web. Why so late to the party?

FEAR AND LOATHING IN LAS BOARDROOM

Hindsight is 20/20, of course. It’s clear today that the Web isn’t going away and that more and more patients are searching and connecting with others online for their healthcare needs and desires. Doctors and nurses and other healthcare professionals are turning to the web too. It’s in the interest of both Healthcare and Pharma to have the kind of solid presences on the web which deliver priceless value to their stakeholders. So what’s been the delay? Why the well-constructed but fear-laden arguments about learning to live in the Socially Hyper-linked Economy?

I think there are many answers to that question. I won’t go into them here: if you work in the industry, please – by all means – publish your hypotheses in the comments below.

But here’s something to think about. It’s been about ten years since Google’s been around – and in the last few years it’s become the primary gateway for finding content online, even with the evolution of social technologies. Are the right kinds of healthcare and Pharma companies turning up in relevant searches? Google will be happy to give you the answer.

Imagine if you started blogging ten years ago about your healthcare organization? Imagine if more Pharma companies started blogging and posting and sharing their ideas about the future of their services – not to please brand managers and push product – just simply to establish authoritative presences online. Think of the compound interest on that Google juice! All gone.

Not to mention, the industries by now would have groomed a generation of bloggers and social media agents who would have learned from their mistakes and be able to lead the industry forward with online presences and communities. Now, it’s catch-up time. Now, all the companies who finally understand the need to be online and to be socially remarkable have to muster through huge, steep ramps. Bonus: they now will be competing with each other, so Google Juice will be harder to grab off the table. And as “easy” as it is to sign up for Twitter and Facebook, the noise you have to compete with gets louder everyday. The cost of attention grows exponentially these days.

Well, that’s all behind us now. A lesson learned I hope.

LOOK FORWARD, ANGEL

Looking forward: if you’re running one of these industries, learn your lesson, reflect on the psychology that held you back from the powers of the web and think seriously about your overall business strategy (not just online) and where you need to go next. Do you understand how the Web may be affecting your business’s ecosystem?

I think for years we have been entering a period of Web Illiteracy – not among the poverty class, but among Corporate Cultures. This is a problem that may be costing our economy billions of dollars: it’s up to you to overcome it.

Here’s my tip to you (I’m including C-suite here): spend an hour a day learning something about the web – no matter how busy your day is. If you’re “old-fashioned”, buy some books about the web (Amazon is generous in this regard – and if you want suggestions or if you want a personal touch, call me 484-362-0451 – I’ll be happy to converse). Here are some offerings for you (they’re just pointers):

  • Learn a tiny amount of HTML (you don’t need to be an expert, but it enhances your understanding of what’s under the hood)
  • Build a simple web page (again, you can skip this, but it helps to know a little something about how a web page works – it’s the practice that may give you an important insight)
  • Learn a bit about SEO (yes, this is still important) – [UPDATE: Social SEO)
  • Ditch Internet Explorer 6.0 – On Windows use Google Chrome or FireFox (to learn the value of extensions). Better yet: invest in a Mac.
  • Learn what blogging really is (it’s not just posting content on a web page) – even if a few people read your blog
  • Learn some things about  Analytics
  • Find out why  RSS is still an important tool (you see those objects on the side of this site – do you know what they mean?)
  • Sign up for Google Reader – it’s been getting social lately
  • Get a Twitter account and play around with it (Copy and paste this into your first tweet: “@PhilBaumann I just signed up for Twitter. What the heck do I do now?“)
  • Tinker with Facebook – poke around all the crazy settings and find out if you can make sense of it yourself
  • These are just tools and tidbits, but they’ll help introduce you to the way things are on the web

Bonus:

  • Question everything you learned during the course of your career and see if any of it means anything anymore. Do you know  what’s changing?
  • Get everyone’s attention in your organization and ask them who knows how to blog or otherwise use social media. Take them out to lunch, listen and learn.

There are other ways to get up to speed on the web. I’m offering the above because they’re rudimentary – they’re the building blocks of the Expanding Web.

THE WEB WILL NOT BE OUTSOURCED

You see, the lesson of the web is this: once the costs of publishing messages reaches zero, the models developed when the costs were in the $Millions cease to hold their relevance.

It’s not enough to outsource your social media practices – I’m not referring only to outside agencies but also to your direct reports. None of us know everything about the web. Since it’s human nature for careerists not to admit to their bosses that they “don’t know”, you can’t rely completely on others to develop your strategy. [Sidenote: in my days as an accountant and analyst in Enterprise, I irritated my executive leadership with “I don’t know”; you know what?: I was promoted like a golden boy. You can’t learn if you’re not curious. Just something for you to think about during your human resources choices.]

You’ve invested decades in climbing to the top. What will be your legacy? Will you discover after all that hard work that you gambled on a dying world?

If you’re an executive of any kind, you need to understand the problems which the web pose – and you can only do that by sitting down, getting online and learning this crazy stuff on your own; and by connecting with the multitude of helpful smart people you can discover via social media. The web is now becoming a brain-to-brain network. Take advantage of that.

Ten years of Google indexing has gone by you. Are you going to let another ten years go to waste?

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Google Reader Gets More Social: Here’s Who to Follow

Image representing Google Reader as depicted i...
Image via CrunchBase

Just days before Facebook acquired FriendFeed, I talked about why FriendFeed is (was) an important tool. Either I was completely wrong or prescient – you decide. FriendFeed.com’s future may be in question – but the social mode it brought onto the web will likely become more ubiquitous as the social web continues to evolve. Which is why I still believe it’s an important tool.

Enter Google Reader (GR). I’ve always thought that RSS could become a powerful social tool if the right features were added. It seems that the Google Reader team is doing just that. Perhaps we’ll see a more FriendFeed-like Google Reader evolving. We will just have to see. The Google Reader team ( @GoogleReader) has its work cut out, but I suspect they’re working towards turning Reader into a powerful social informational tool.

For now, if you’re interested in “following” some smart people in your Google Reader, here is a real-time list of Google Readers from FriendFeed:

Oh, and you’re certainly welcome to follow me on Google Reader :)

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How Microsoft Might Take on Google

Furrier.org is claiming that Microsoft is planning to eek out Yahoo’s search engine business and, furthermore, that it plans to purchase Facebook. In light of Facebook’s efforts to block Google’s access to its data, this could make a lot of sense.

With the link between Google and Facebook broken, Microsoft could very well attempt to exploit the assets of Yahoo search, including its expert staff, to establish two pokes in the fire: search and social web.

Microsoft probably understands that in order to remain in the game, it will have to dominate social media. We’ll have to see how this story develops because it could one of the biggest stories of the decade.