FriendFeed: Still Great At Social Search

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Image via CrunchBase

FriendFeed – the uber social-aggregation-lifestream service of the geeky and nerdy – may have an uncertain future given its recent acquisition by Facebook, but its powerful search features remain one of the best ways to search the web. I put together this short screencast for my Twitter buddy  @DaphneLeigh. FriendFeed’s interface can be difficult for some to get used to, so I’ve been assembling short visual tutorials to help out.

Why these tutorials now that FriendFeed may be “dead”? First, when Silicon Valley announces something dead, it doesn’t mean it’s not used: blogs are “dead”, and so is RSS – but they’re very much around – my view: they’re not really dead, they just have new life. Second, I think FriendFeed’s approach to lifestreaming represents the direction of the social web. Third, the FriendFeed’s search is one of the strongest on the web: whereas Google has its algorithm for finding content on servers, FriendFeed adds the benefit of human filtering, such as Likes and comments (the more Likes and comments, the more likely the content has more value and relevance).

If the video embed is working for you, here’s where you can view it (view in fullscreen mode):

Are you using  FriendFeed? Even if you don’t is real-time social search something you would take advantage of? Or might some other service some along and outshine it? Like a social version of Google Reader?

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Google Reader Gets More Social: Here’s Who to Follow

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Image via CrunchBase

Just days before Facebook acquired FriendFeed, I talked about why FriendFeed is (was) an important tool. Either I was completely wrong or prescient – you decide. FriendFeed.com’s future may be in question – but the social mode it brought onto the web will likely become more ubiquitous as the social web continues to evolve. Which is why I still believe it’s an important tool.

Enter Google Reader (GR). I’ve always thought that RSS could become a powerful social tool if the right features were added. It seems that the Google Reader team is doing just that. Perhaps we’ll see a more FriendFeed-like Google Reader evolving. We will just have to see. The Google Reader team ( @GoogleReader) has its work cut out, but I suspect they’re working towards turning Reader into a powerful social informational tool.

For now, if you’re interested in “following” some smart people in your Google Reader, here is a real-time list of Google Readers from FriendFeed:

Oh, and you’re certainly welcome to follow me on Google Reader :)

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Why FriendFeed Is An Important Tool

Image representing FriendFeed as depicted in C...
Image via CrunchBase

Today I saw a tweet by  @BonnieRN to  @bthenextstep asking why he uses FriendFeed. Most of the people I know on Twitter don’t use FF (unless Twitter gets nailed by a DoS :) I decided to help her understand over on FriendFeed and I’m embedding the post here.

I think the point about ePaitents is worth noting by those who are interested in developing ways new media can be used in health care. Those of us who are Twitter addicts (and that’s not such a bad thing), need to appreciate that there a billions of other people in the world who have completely different perspectives – people use new media in their own ways. And we need to appreciate much more fully the role cultural differences play in how people use technologies and the communities they spur.

In fact, those of us who are serious about improving health care (online or away from the keyboard) have a duty to transcend our own habits and echo chambers. New media changes everyday – like Ferris Bueller said Life moves pretty fast. You don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.

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