How to Kill Patients and Get Away With It

The feeling of moral responsibility is inversely proportional to the distance between the moral agent and the point of responsibility.

The closer the point of responsibility, the greater the feeling of responsibility.

To illustrate: it’s easier to blow the face off of a toddler by passive consent to war when she’s 6,000 miles away than 30 feet in front of you. Why? It’s much easier to justify the killing when the toddler has no face to begin with in your mind’s eye.

This is why  banality is so evil – if you don’t feel a sense of responsibility, it’s harder to step up. You feel no reason.

With that, let’s explore how our healthcare institutions, ideologies, practices, providers, FDA, HIPAA, information systems and vendors can continue to kill patients…and get away with it.

Continue reading…

@PhilBaumann@HealthIsSocial

Interview at #epatcon: Connecting Patients with Physicians, EMRs and EHRs

I attended ePatient10 this week in Philadelphia and got the chance to meet some wonderful people interested in improving patient-provider relations, healthcare communication and the adoption and employment of emerging technologies in healthcare.

One of the questions I raised had to do with getting physicians involved in the growing discussions about these plays for importance. It’s my view that physician involvement can be a sort of limiting agent, and that rather than “taking on” physicians, they aught to be approached from where they are coming from so that they can better understand why it’s important to listen.

The video of my summary of the question is over here: pixelsandpills:

You can catch up with the conference tweets here: #ePatCon.

Twitter Chat for Physicians #MDchat

@MD_chatOver a year ago, I started RNchat, a Twitter chat for registered nurses. At that time, I considered launching a similar venture for physicians, but decided that eventually some physician would take a stab at creating one.

It’s been a year, and after seeing the success of RNchat and the need for the perspective of physicians, I realized I should re-visit the idea of a Twitter chat for physicians. After teasing it several weeks ago from @HealthIsSocial, it was clear that there was a lot of interest.

So earlier today I announced the launch of MDchat. The hashtag will be #MDchat and the Twitter account that will administrate it is @MD_chat (mind the underscore).

The full post with the details and the rationales for launching this novel little platform for physicians is right here.

This kind of venue may not be for every physician. That’s OK. But my feeling is that there is a growing realization that the emerging technologies of our century beg to be discerned by all fields – and medicine is certainly no exception.

Feel free to join in! You can Follow @MD_chat right here.