Angry Birds for Angry Times

I’ve been having some fun with Angry Birds, a game which – as of today – has garnered 30 Million downloads. One-third of those downloads are paid versions.

Now when I say that I’m having frun with Angry Birds, I’m being a bit snarky. The game is a lot of fun, and I can completely see how it can hook and suck people into it for hours. Very addictive indeed.

But my fun is really about talking about Angry Birds. I’ve jokingly thought about how to re-purpose the game, and how goofy it would be to build in Twitter integration, or even develop a full-blown Angry Birds Twitter client. (Regarding that Twitter client, I’ll have to set aside another post or video for that.)

And yet I have hunch that Angry Birds represents something happening deep within our culture.

CHIRP, TWEET, BOOM

Gaming and entertainment are very important parts of living a healthy and active life. But there are different kinds of games and different kinds of entertainment. What kinds of games we play and set our children to play matter a great deal.

And there are those little matters of time and dopamine and focus. What affects might these 21st Century games have on us?

I also think Angry Birds may be showing us a glimpse of the future of technology and our relationship with it. When you consider that these games can have social features attached to them, and that they can be integrated into other technologies, it sparks the imagination into what’s possible – or not.

I love watching and commenting and thinking about how technology evolves, infiltrates our lives and what it might end up doing to the world around us. It’s a smart practice to develop our intuition for technology.

So I’ll be having fun with Angry Birds, and using it to poke loving fun at social media experts, marketers and the rest of us who are – or will soon be – caught in the fascinating snares the Technium.

THE TIMES, THEY ARE A BOB DYLANING

We live in angry times. We live in anxious times. Technology is fueling both.

But Technology opens up and reveals things we otherwise would not notice. Twitter has revealed a social construct within us we didn’t know existed.

Angry Birds – as metaphor – may represent our need to seek relief from the pressures of a technologically-fueled world through….technology.

Angry Birds is a jovial – though addictive – reminder that we need mindfulness in our lives, if we want happiness in them.

Happy Birds. Not sure if that’s an app which will be downloaded 30 Million times.

But there is an app that can’t be developed for the iPhone or iPad or Android. It is called Mindfulness.

I think the struggle for Mindfulness will be among the fiercest this Century. We might forget who serves whom – will technology serve us, or will we serve it?

Who knows, maybe those 5 Angry Birds will wake us up. 🙂

For my real-time and penetrating thoughts on Angry Birds, you can view them here.

You can also view the latest updates on Angry Birds in newspaper format here.

Be mindful. May you always LOL. And may you always remember who you serve.

@PhilBaumann

P.S. Here’s a cool article on the physics of Angry Birds.

3 Comments

  1. You should definitely check out the “No, Human” iPhone app. The interaction is somewhat like Angry Birds (destroy something by launching something else) but with a totally different tone. It’s both spookier and more Zen-like. Playing both, I had a similar thought about why Angry Birds is the more popular once these days.

Comments are closed.